Monday, February 26, 2007

Jesus' Tomb Found?

Director James Cameron, of Titanic fame, has a new film which claims that the tomb of Jesus has been found. Further, it claims that He and Mary Magdalene were a couple and that they had a son named Judah.

In 1980, Israeli construction workers building an apartment complex in the East Talpiot district uncovered 10 2,000 year-old ossuaries, 6 of which bore the names
Mary, Matthew, Jesua son of Joseph, Mary, Jofa (Joseph, Jesus' brother), and Judah son of Jesua.

While Cameron says, "It doesn't get any bigger than this," most others say they don't believe the tomb to be that of the Biblical Christ. The names were actually common for the day and most people think Cameron and company are simply trying to sell their film. Cameron insists that DNA and other evidence backs up his claims, though.

Most authorities on the subject and related matters do not expect Christians to accept Cameron's notions, but the entire idea is sure to bring debate - hopefully healthy debate, but not likely...

3 comments:

  1. The unedited version of this documentary will air Monday night on the Discovery Times Channel, along with previously unreleased footage!

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  2. Healthy debate about a myth and a possible myth-buster? Hmmmm...doubtful is right.

    My opinion is that The Da Vinci Code made so much money just because of the controversy it generated (because it just was not that great on it's own merit), this guy thinks he can make some money by creating his own controversy. Well, more power to him. If I could come up with a good scandal that would make me some money I'd probably do it, too. But I'm not going to buy into this one.

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  3. I missed the special, but it apparently failed to generate the controversy Cameron may have hoped for. I'm not sure what to think, but I believe the Biblical and historical Jesus are likely to be very different.

    I do, however, believe he performed miracles. That's the whole point I make in a lot of these posts: people don't really just make up things like, "He walked on water."

    Unlike Da Vinci Code, this one at least had some historical merit (possibly).

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