Tuesday, June 26, 2007

Ghost of Guy and Gus, The Nazi

These two accounts seem to fall into the Poltergeist category, and I thought I would post them in order that they might be used to further the categorization and division discussion with which I have recently been involved (with myself, but maybe one day, someone will comment).

One of the earliest and best documented "spirit voice" cases in Europe is that of Guy from the year, 1323. In the town of Alais, Provence, a spirit voice was heard in a private home, shortly after the owner, one Guy de Torno, died. The disturbance was so noisome that it brought four friars from the local priory who are said to have actually held a conversation with the ghost. After eight days, they claimed the voice had told them the only way it could be released from haunting its former home is if they said 100 Masses for his soul. After doing so, the voice disappeared and did not return. Some insist that de Torno's widow, who was said to be unstable, may have fooled the townspeople and friars through ventriloquism, but my problem with this is very simple: she would have been called a witch (even though this predates witch-burning slightly) and, if she (or really anyone else) had done this for attention, why would they suddenly stop? Why not continue the ruse? If not doing it for attention, then why do it at all? The only other possible explanation would be that the widow thought her husband a wicked man and, being unstable, thought this the best way to put his soul to rest. But... eight days? Occam's Razor itself insists this was a real haunting.

The other story I liked because it is an actual German poltergeist (poltergeist is German for "noisy ghost") and was first reported in Bavaria in 1949. "Gus the Nazi" took exception to German women who fraternized with Allied forces and threw things at them, even tipped them from their beds! In one account, he is said to have cropped the hair of a girl in front of her parents!

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