Thursday, May 25, 2017

Focusrite 212

Here is another one with which I am unfamiliar. Keep in mind I played percussion, not strings, so it makes sense I would not know a lot of these pedals, amps, cords, and so forth. I have musician friends who still work in the industry, and some even play to this day, but I don't like to bother them with every little question. So here is the focusrite 2i2, check it out at MusiciansFriend.com... and let me know what it is, if you like!

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Introductory Space Science, Vol. II - Chapter 33

For decades, many have suspected US involvement in clandestine space programs.  In the early 2000s, a Scottish IT specialist by the name of Gary McKinnon hacked US security, claiming to have discovered definitive proof of just such a thing.  Lending some apparent credence to McKinnon's claims is the existence of Chapter 33 from the Introductory Space Science, VOL II book used to instruct US Air Force officers from 1968 to at least 1970.

In 1970, Chapter 33 of Introductory Space Science, Vol. II was edited to include information from "The Condon Report," or Project Blue Book.  Part of the text reads, "Approximately 6% of the UFO reports collected by Project Blue Book are officially listed as 'unexplained.'"  Project Blue Book was a USAF investigation into UFO sightings from 1947 to 1969 which operated under at least different three names, including "Sign," and "Grudge."

The last sentence of Chapter 33 of Introductory Space Science, Vol. II reads, "The best thing to do is to keep an open and skeptical mind, and not take an extreme position on any side of the question."

© The Weirding, 2017

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Non-Terrestrial Officers

Gary McKinnon
Gary McKinnon
According to Gary McKinnon, a Scottish IT specialist who hacked US security in the early 2000s, the United States has an army of "Non-Terrestrial Officers" not based on Earth.  Gary McKinnon was indicted for hacking the US government in 2002, facing up to 70 years in a US prison and as much as US$2mn in fines.

McKinnon claims he saw logs detailing ship-to-ship transfers of a "space army" called Non-Terrestrial Officers in internal memos.  He says Building 8 at Johnson Space Center is where NASA regularly airbrushes-out UFOs from images it releases to the public.  McKinnon also claims he saw low-resolution images of cigar-shaped spacecraft without rivets or seams that were clearly "not man-made."  The information he uncovered has been tied to the alleged existence of a US military space program known as "Solar Warden," started in the 1980s.  Neither McKinnon's case, nor the information he claims to have uncovered, drew as much media attention as one would imagine, being largely forgotten today.

Gary McKinnon hacked into numerous US security agencies often tied to UFOlogy and conspiracy theories, including NASA; DARPA; the Army Military District in Washington, DC; and others.  His claims confirmed beliefs regarding the US military's space program that many have held for years, but otherwise fell on deaf ears.  Gary McKinnon's extradition to the United States was blocked in 2012.

© The Weirding, 2017

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Dendera Zodiac Color Reconstruction

Dendera Zodiac Color Reconstruction
Dendera Zodiac Color Reconstruction
The Dendera Zodiac appears in the Egyptian Dendera Temple, dedicated to Osiris.  It is also known as the Temple of Hathor.  This is a colorized representation of what the Dendera Zodiac may have looked like in or around 50 BC, when the Temple was believed to have been in use.

© The Weirding, 2017

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

US President Jimmy Carter's UFO Report

Jimmy Carter's UFO Report
Jimmy Carter's UFO Report
Jimmy Carter filed this UFO incident report on September 18, 1973.  He served as the 39th US President from 1977 to 1981.

© The Weirding, 2017

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

The Solway Spaceman

The Solway Spaceman
The Solway Spaceman
Photo by Solway Firth, 1964.

© The Weirding, 2017

Monday, April 3, 2017

Guitar Center

Although we often bring you information on websites to visit for your musical needs, there is nothing like hands-on shopping for musical equipment. If you are in the area, be sure to check out guitar center algonquin, which carries far more than just guitars and guitar-related equipment (despite its name). You can still expect great deals and specials offline! There are also locations in other areas, so be sure to check the website for more information.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

The "Lost" Thunderbird Photo

The "Lost" Thunderbird Photo
The "Lost" Thunderbird Photo

Thunderbirds - and "living dinosaurs," in general - are a difficult topic to discuss, due to religious Fundamentalists, moneyed "experts" who receive backing from shady organizations and are known to falsify research, and a general lack of evidence that has been made public.

Many photos, video documentation, even alleged specimen, regarding a great number of topics we discuss exist in private collections that are not made accessible to the public. Some can be found in reputable books (where they were licensed for publication), others in privately-owned museums where no photography is allowed, and elsewhere - just not online. Uploading them can result in termination of accounts (though the images are usually just reported/removed), and has - as they are protected by Copyright and similar restrictions.

Stories of Thunderbirds go back centuries, but appear to be specific to North America. While tales of winged, sky-faring, man-eating beasts appear in cultures around the world, the very term is taken from Native American accounts. Early settlers' accounts repeatedly mention the fear American Indians had of these creatures, and record tales of their attacks on people - mostly children. These scant details bear the hallmarks of Legend, but the story goes deeper.

Accounts of posses being amassed, and hunts being organized, for Thunderbirds also exist in historical record. In several cases, these hunts were carried-out by otherwise serious-minded, "common" people of Anglo-Saxon descent who may have been swept-up by hysterical tales of recent attacks, or sightings in the area. Others were expeditions carried-out by wealthy trophy hunters - even more important, as it proves that belief in these tales was strong enough to entice men of a higher status (and assumptively better education) into paying top-dollar, and traveling the world to brave unchartered territory, just for the chance to nab one!

There are a handful of similar photos, all of which appear to be fakes based on the fabled accounts of "The Lost Thunderbird picture" - none of which mention Vicksburg or the Civil War, by the way. Most Thunderbird accounts of that period came from the American Southwest - Arizona and the immediate area, to be precise. Some of these tales were likely cases of mistaken identity coupled with fear - the product of conditioning from hearing tales of such fearsome, loathsome beasts since childhood - others, however, are not as easily dismissed.

And though some modern researchers have conducted studies that seemingly "prove" modern people untrained in Zoology often misidentify known creatures - not something serious researchers question in the first place - their apocryphal data proves nothing regarding the knowledge of ancient tribal peoples whose entire lives were spent living and working in tandem with their natural surroundings. This is especially true of American Indian culture, which revered nature and the animal kingdom. On a separate note, the very hypothesis smacks of racial bias, as it seems to "confirm" the era's prevailing, racist views toward Amer-Indians more than anything.

This alleged picture of a Thunderbird hunt may well be the "Lost Thunderbird Photo" of paranormal lore. While many have attempted to debunk it, no conclusive evidence proving its fraudulence has come to light. Proffering that it may have been a hoax of its day - a staged photo in front of a theatrical prop or taxidermic creation - is a sound approach toward establishing reasonable doubt; resorting to claims of digital manipulation is lazy at best, and not at all convincing. As always, I am not claiming this is an authentic photograph; I remain hopefully skeptical that it is, and so far unswayed by attempts to debunk it.

Especially since I am not sure how this picture made it online, since I think it belongs to a private collection. Most of the photos from said private collection are unavailable online (although many are available in print), so I am not entirely sure how this particular photo of an alleged Thunderbird hunt around the turn of the 19th-Century persevered.

Though I, too, may be mistaken.

© The Weirding, 2017