Saturday, December 27, 2008

300-Year Old Aftershock?

Scientists claim the earthquake many New Hampshire towns felt on the weekend prior to Christmas was an aftershock from the 1727 earthquake.

About 4:35pm, December 21st, residents reported a slight earthquake. Scientists say it was an aftershock of the 1727 earthquake, which registered a 5.3 on the Richter scale. They say aftershocks have been felt for three centuries since the earthquake, including one in October 2007.

Of course, 300-year old aftershocks are odd enough, but staying true to the nature of this blog, I have to wonder if the scientists and media aren't trying to cover-up what seems to be increasing earthquake activity in the Eastern United States. I find this grossly negligent.

Speaking from a layman's point-of-view, I think 300 years is right around the statute of limitations for calling an earthquake an "aftershock." The October, 2007 earthquake in this region measured a 1.3 on the Richter scale. I understand if certain factions want to avoid mass panic, but if there is substantial earthquake activity in a region (as there appears to be in the middle-Eastern United States), the focus should be on preparing for the possibility of a big one, not assuaging everyone's fears!

© C Harris Lynn, 2008

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